The Dissing of Henry George

Henry George (1839–1897) was a journalist, self-educated economist and philosopher, and eventually prominent politician. In 1879 he published Progress and Poverty, which soon became a worldwide bestseller. His followers played a major role in the early 20th Century Progressive movement. How could it happen that if he is remembered at all today, he’s considered a crackpot? . . . → Read More: The Dissing of Henry George

Where Did The Wealth of Nations Come From?

Adam Smith (1723-1790) published The Wealth of Nations in 1776, also the year of the American Revolution. Both the Wealth of Nations and the Declaration of Independence sprang from a context, the so-called “Enlightenment.”

The Enlightenment in turn has a history, traced in the lectures of Alan Charles Kors, on “The Birth of the Modern . . . → Read More: Where Did The Wealth of Nations Come From?

Economan Captures the Knowledge Economy: David Warsh on Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations

David Warsh’s engaging new book Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations tells two stories. One story, beginning with Adam Smith, covers the history of thought about the relationship of economic growth and economies of scale. Warsh finds in Smith a contradiction between the huge technical economies of the pin factory, which should create monopolies, and . . . → Read More: Economan Captures the Knowledge Economy: David Warsh on Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations

Wealth of Nations, Wolf on Jacobs, Krugman on Warsh

Martin Wolf of the Financial Times, calls Jane Jacobs, who died last week, “a self-educated intellectual of astonishing originality.” He devotes most of his article, “National wealth on city life’s coat tails” (5/2/06) to a review of one of his and my favorite books, Jacob’s 1984 Cities and the Wealth of Nations — which he . . . → Read More: Wealth of Nations, Wolf on Jacobs, Krugman on Warsh